Who’s The Prettiest of Them All?

I bought this panel of the Frozen princesses To make a quilt ( or wall hanging) for my grand-niece who is a great fan of the two!

The Frozen Princesses Anna and Elsa are my grand-niece K’s favourites!

She was due to visit us and I thought of a quick gift for her. But how boring would this be!

So I came up with this idea.

K goes to the centre of the panel, while the other two look at her admiringly.

I printed her face on a printer-ready fabric sheet after calculating the size I would need to make it.

Everything got more complicated than necessary because I planned to put K on the right side. I cut out the pink princess ( is that Elsa or Anna?) before I realised that that would make my darling Princess K an ‘outsider’ because the other two had interlocked arms.

So I disengaged their arms and locked them with Princess K’s who moved to the centre. Ah, that’s the way I like it. The Disney Princesses look at her admiringly ( and a bit enviously?). The Resident Consultant did not think much of my original idea of a silver dress for his Princess. So I retained the silver yoke and made her blue dress from…a rayon grocery bag! ( Jaipur is a big exporter of women’s clothing. With single use plastic being banned in India, our shopkeepers are using bags made from export-surplus fabric and export-reject dresses).

The quilting was kept to a minimum. ( Also because I had just over a couple of hours for the quilting and finishing). I folded the lighter pink border to the back of the quilted piece, leaving the darker plum inner border to frame the quilt. No binding. The top border became the sleeve.

Not that my Princess minded the short-cuts taken to finish her portrait! She couldn’t believe what she saw.

“How? wow! how? wow…”, she exclaimed!

And here is the Princess herself, posing with her quilted wall-hanging.

Princess K loves her quilt!

Now that done, I have to decide what comes up next!

Pali Darwaza at Rajgad Fort—A Quilted Portrait!

Thread Sketch of Entrance Gate to ‘Rajgarh, Hill of the Kingdom’

Completed Quilt#2 in my 19th century wood engraving print series! 7” x10” The original print dated 1883, is 3.5”x5” and the image is from periodpaper.com.

The original wood engraving from periodpaper.com

The monument shown is, I believe, Pali Darwaza or the ‘first gate’, at Rajgad ” king of all forts “, near Pune, in Maharashtra, India. Rajgad, known as the unconquerable fort, has a history going back to at least the 15th century, but is best known because of its association with the great Shivaji, whose capital it was for over 26 years! Interestingly, this is a reverse image of the original monument, possibly because the original engraving on wood was correct, but when printed on paper, it got reversed. Look at this picture, from Wikipedia, taken from above, would you agree?

A Photograph of the Pali Darwaza from Wikicommons

Here is the reverse of my quilt, picture taken before I quilted the background.

I photoshopped the original picture to reduce the contrast and gave it an antique paper finish, before printing it on A4 size printer ready fabric sheet.

Tha sandwich was made with thin poly-batting and free-motion quilted with YLI Softouch ( black) and variegated Gutermann (sand) on Hasina, my Husqvarna Viking Topaz 20. I wanted to clarify that is not first thread painted and then quilted. Finished the edges with a simple zigzag ( which makes it eady to frame under glass, in case the recipient decides to) and a corner curled in to give it a dog-eared look! Here is a close-up!

Can you guess that you are going to see more of these thread sketches here?

‘The Tchatri at Tintoui’…Sketching With Thread and Some Detective Work

One thing that has always entranced me is the illustrations of buildings and places from the India of the nineteenth century. As the British travelled across this vast and fascinating land that they had recently colonised, they made a record of its diverse flora and fauna, its people and its rich architectural heritage. An artist usually travelled with the demographer/geographer/biologist/historian and the final document presented to the world was beautifully illustrated …such intricate drawings, with the minutest details!

Ever since I learnt to sketch with India ink on paper, I wanted to be able to draw like that! (One had those nib pens, that you dipped in bottles of ink and you controlled the width of the stroke by the angle of the nib and the pressure applied!) I never got around to it, but you can see some of my drawings from those days, about 40 years ago, here.

When I started quilting, I wondered if I could replicate those ink drawings with thread. I finally got around to trying it a few days back!

I would start with something not too complicated, I decided. This seemed a good candidate!

I reduced the contrast and brightened the image, till I had an outline of the basic shapes monuments and trees. I then changed the image size to 8″ x 10″ and printed it on printer- ready fabric. Added a 2.5″ wide mitred border in black and prepared the quilt sandwich with thin poly batting.

It was free motion quilted on Hasina, my Topaz 20 ( embroidery needle size 70) using YLI Softtouch thread.

Here are some pictures showing the progress of the quilting!

Thread sketching the chhatri
A close up of the tree
I love the back as much as the front!

I quilted the background with Invisafil smoke.

The background done in Invisafil smoke and the quilting is almost done, bar the finishing touches!

I wondered how it would look if I coloured it lightly, but was scared to ruin it. Then I had a brilliant idea! I flipped the quilt over, and tinted some areas of the back of the quilt with Inktense colour pencils! And added the border with some fancy stitches.

I think I like the back better than the front, but no one seems to agree!

When I flipped it over, I loved the back as much as I liked the front! Or perhaps more!

Now began my search for the monument that had been the inspiration for the wood engraving.

The legend read, ‘Tchatri at Tintoui in Bheel Country’ and I presumed that these would be the chhatris ( pavilions or canopies built over a place where a member of a royal family was cremated) near Udaipur in Rajasthan. The Bheels a proud, warrior tribe have long inhabited the forests near Udaipur. But I wondered about Tintoui.

A search on google maps took me to Tintoi in Gujarat, South of Udaipur, presumably also ‘Bheel Country’ – you can see how the hill forest to the West of Udaipur continued southward to the North of Tintoi.

Now to hunt for a chhatri near/ in Tintoi! Is it possible that Tintoi, now a small village, was earlier the name of a much larger surrounding area? Further research revealed that Sabarkantha District in which Tintoi Village was located also had ancient monuments in a forest area, called the Polo Forest! From there it was easy!

Not only was I on the right track, I also found my pair of chhatris, sadly much worse for wear over the last 140 odd years! But totally recognisable, including the tree with its slanting trunk! The website of Gujrat Tourism provided me the best picture of my chhatris! !But…the chhatris seem to be ‘flipped horizontal’ or a mirror image of the wood engraving! How was that possible? Then it struck me. The original engraving was true to the monument, but when it was printed on paper, a mirror image was created! Check the back of my quilt!

Isn’t that amazing!?

You can imagine how delighted I was. The Polo Forest is definitely on my bucket list of places to visit now!

I leave you with this image of my finished mini quilt. But I will be back soon with another thread sketch, for this is addictive, I tell you!

Quilts of a Feather–A Quilt-Along—Part Three

The peacock is the theme of the India Quilt Festival, 2019 and I have designed a quilted peacock feather that you can make–as a participant in q quilt-along–to feel a part of the first ever quilt show in India! This is the fourth and final post in this quilt-along. I have given the list of materials required in the first post, the cutting instructions in the second and the tracing instructions in the third post of this series.

Now the real fun begins. I promise you that this is addictive!

Quilting the Peacock Feather

I would have liked to have a free-motion quilting foot, but a walking foot will work equally well for this small feather. I do not have even a walking foot, but I have not added a batting to my feather, so I think a regular foot will have to work here! Let us see how it goes.

  1. The first thing I have to do is quilt the centre of my feather (which you may remember, I do not have in place at all!) So I flip over to the backing side and quilt the outline of the centre of the feather. I turn it around and realize I had white thread in the bobbin, so the outline shows up in white on the front. I am not very happy with this, but eventually, it will not matter.
Quilt the outmost outline of the centre of the feather, from the backing side.
The outline shows up in front and will serve as a guide for placing the centre layers.
2. Now I know exactly where the centre of my feather lies! I pin it in place, and zigzag over the edge of the outermost green layer. I then zigzag over the other three layers, beginning with the centremost to get the pin out of the way.
Place the 4 layers of the centre fabric and sew down the outmost layer using a zigzag stitch.
Next zigzag stitch over the innermost layer, followed by the light blue and lastly the yellow.

I have used dark blue thread, but you could use a deep yellow, or a dark green or even black—anything that will contrast nicely with your fabrics. If you do not have a zigzag stitch on your machine, use the straight stitch. A tiny satin stitch will work equally well! The great thing about this feather is that you do whatever you are comfortable with. The intent is to have fun! And now the fun begins.

3. With centre in place, I turn the sandwich over and start quilting over the lines in the pattern traced on the backing. I do the central spine of the feather first.

Start quilting over the rest of the feather from the back, beginning from bottom of the central spine, travelling all the way to the top and returning to the bottom.

The trick is to quilt slowly; it is quite simple really, just quilting over a line drawn on the fabric!

4.I then start doing the rest of the feather, beginning again at the bottom. Start from the central spine, travel to the outer edge, travelling up the edge a little to the next line…

…stop the machine with needle down, turn around the sandwich and travel back to the centre. Travel up a little to the next line and repeat!

The feather starts taking shape in the front…
…quilted over the pencil lines from the back!

Once one side of the spine is quilted, I sew over the lines on the other side. In less than 10 minutes, I am done! The best part is that one does not need to panic if one strays from the lines. Your feather need not look exactly like mine, after all.

5. I am ready to add details to the feather now. I start, literally, to quilt between the lines. Note that I go beyond the outline in several places, just travelling with the flow!


Another 10 minutes, and I have finished quilting my feather!

That looks great doesn’t it? Let us check it from the front?
Oh Wow!

The Final Step

6. Now I am ready for bringing my feather to life! I pick up my really sharp scissors and start trimming the feather along the quilted outline. At first, I am a little circumspect.

Use sharp scissors to trim away the excess fabric.
That looks good!

But then I become more adventurous, travelling almost up to the central spine with my scissors to make my feather look realistic. Let me check it from the back.

The Quilted Peacock Feather The feather from the back.

Time for the final reveal?

The Quilted Peacock Feather All done!

 

For a list of materials required and the PDF pattern for the quilted feather, refer to the first post about this quilt along.
For the cutting instructions for the feather, refer to the second post about this quilt along. You can download a PDF file containing cutting instructions from that post.
The tracing instructions (including a PDF file) are given in the third post, a continuation of my second post. The download link to the quilting instructions is below. If you want to make a larger 10.5″ or smaller 5.5″ feather, download the pattern below. Remember you need to keep the feather and background fabric at least 2″ bigger than the finished feather, on all sides!

1. Quilted Peacock Feather-Quilting Instructions
2. Quilted Peacock Feather-10.5″
3. Quilted Peacock Feather-5.5″

Quilts of a Feather-A Quilt-Along-Part Two (continued)

I am back from my walk, and took this pretty picture of oak leaves to share with you. 

Anyone else see a quilt there? I know I do!

So, let’s move to the next step, shall we?

Tracing the Pattern

Pins mark the top and bottom edge of the feather and the centre

I will trace the pattern on to the backing fabric. I have used white; you could use any light colured fabric, perhaps a blue or a green?

The pins are in place to mark the top and bottom edges of the feather and the centre.

I placed the white fabric on the paper print-out of the peacock feather outline and traced it using an ordinary HB lead pencil! I would recommend you use a washable marker if you have access to one. Remember the tracing is to be made on the right side of the backing.

I had a glass table to work on so it was easy to see through the white fabric. You could tape the paper pattern on a glass window and the background fabric on top of that.

When I was tracing from the pattern, I realized that the centre was not marked very clearly on the pattern. Now, what?

I placed the fabric centre of the feather, wrong side up on the tracing and drew the outline on the backing.

The Quilted Peacock Feather
I placed the green centre ( wrong side up) on the centre of the backing fabric and traced around it to get the centre edges.
The Quilted Peacock Feather
You can see the centre traced here…

Simple solution, right?

Now my backing is ready. I remove the paper from below, but I leave the pins in place to mark the top and bottom of the feather and the centre on the backing. These are important.

Preparing the Quilt Sandwich

I don’t have any batting, so I don’t make a regular sandwich at all! But, as for you, it is time to prepare the quilt sandwich as you usually do…

Layer 1–the black background fabric for the feather on the bottom, placed wrong side up.

Layer 2–the batting (or a piece of flannel/ other thick fabric, if you do not have batting)

Layer 3–the backing right side up (with the tracing on top).

Now I carefully pin the three layers together, in exactly the same place as on the backing. This gives me the edges of my feather, and helps me in the placement of the blue-green fabric that will form the main body of my feather.

The sandwich from the front.

Where is the centre of the feather, you ask? For that you will have to wait–till I am ready to start quilting. Meanwhile, I am waiting for you to share your chosen fabrics on Facebook! Happy cutting, tracing and pinning!

For a list of materials required and the PDF pattern for the 7″ quilted feather, refer to the first post about this quilt along.

For the cutting instructions for the feather, refer to the second post about this quilt along. You can also download a PDF file containing cutting instructions from that post.

If you want a print-out of the tracing instructions given above, download the PDF file given below here.

Quilted Peacock Feather – Tracing Instructions (Part 2.2)

GRO Jaipur

Natural, Fresh, Direct.

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GRO Jaipur

Natural, Fresh, Direct.

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This and that....some rhyme, not all reason

twin hobbies

living with twin daughters

Lori Kennedy Quilts my m

From Doodle to Design

Trends and Traditions

Where Trendy meets Traditional Quilting, by Designer Heather Mulder Peterson of Anka's Treasures

Lorelle on WordPress

utorials about WordPress, blogging, social media, and having your say on the web.

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